Gravel Bicycling Journal

bicycling, biking, blogging, Daily Post, gravel, history, Journal, revolution, Uncategorized, Virginia, woods, forest

On this particular day, My journey starts at Newport News Park, in Newport News, VA.  The park offers a 5.3 mile, hard-packed gravel, bike loop beginning at the Campsite Office. The path is fairly well shaded with an overhead canopy from beautiful trees. About half- way through the loop, a placard on the trail indicates George Washington’s Headquarters.

If you decide to further your bike ride another 5.6 miles and back, this loop crosses into the Colonial National Historical Park, in Yorktown, VA which leads to George Washington’s Headquarters, this route is mostly flat and wide wooded trails and some paved one lane roads.

Gravel bikers, mountain bikers, and hikers will see ramparts still in place from battles past.

This section is known as the French Artillery Park, it was an open field where the French established its ordinance depot.  Damaged pieces where brought here for repairs.

I biked a little further on the trail, wondering where this will lead me.  My bike computer reads I am six miles into my unknown journey. I thought, should I turn around or keep on.  About 20 yards ahead of me, I got spooked when two deer ran in front of me; not knowing if there were more, I stopped and took out my iPhone ready to take a picture, but I didn’t see any.  My history lesson continues as another placard appears.

In 1770, this is the spot of “General Nelson’s quarters

A little further on the trail was Daboville’s Headquarters.  It is difficult for me to visualize this area was inhabited and with plantation buildings.

Daboville’s Headquarters


 

On one side of the gravel road, stands a lonely marker, known as the Essex Lodge Cemetery.  It is dedicated to the memory of those who rest here.  The forebear’s and descendants of Thomas Wynn.  Host of General George Washington, October 1781.

This simple cross is thought to mark the burial place of about 50 unidentified French soldiers killed during the Siege of Yorktown.

Now, I am off onto a beaten path; where I see a group of turkeys.  There are a dozen or more, but as biked closer most of them scattered into the brambles.  I took a picture, but I only could photograph two turkeys.       

I hope you all enjoyed gravel bike ride through history. Comments are welcomed.

Jefferson Hotel, Richmond, VA

18th century, blogging, history, Uncategorized, Virginia

On our one-day bus tour, we arrived at the Jefferson Hotel a luxury hotel located in Richmond, VA, opened in 1895.   In 1969, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Not only is the Jefferson Hotel known for its authentic opulence, it has become synonymous with its extraordinary dining, breathtaking architecture and flawless service. This is what we saw as we entered the hotel. The photo to the right is the rear view.

You can see the stairs that led us to our dining area.  This particular day a group of school children sang Christmas carols as we journeyed up the stairs to our tables.

Carolers

We did not stay in the hotel rooms, but we did enjoy the feel of luxury.  We had a great luncheon with our bus group of 50 spread across five tables (10 each to a table).  We sat on the second tier of the rotunda which gave us a birds eye view of the plush, phenomenal décor of statues, columns and paintings. 

Table for ten


We were instantly served a mixed salad with a house dressing.  After we finished the salad, the servers brought our meal, a choice of salmon or pork tenderloin, garlic mashed potatoes, assorted vegetables, and warm rolls. My thick salmon was garnished with a lemon sauce that seeped through the salmon. My taste buds savored every bit of this fine cuisine.  Desert was a cheesecake garnished with fresh strawberries and whipped cream along with a choice of coffee or tea.

It is beautiful every day of the year, but exceptionally stunning during the Christmas season with its beautiful Christmas display of ornaments, an ideal time to visit the Jefferson Hotel. 

Fort Monroe, Hampton VA

American revolution, colonial, Colonies, history, Paintings, Virginia

 

This is a plein air painting I did with acrylic paints on a 11 x 14 x .50 inch stretch canvas.  Inside Fort Monroe a moat surrounds the casemate, this is where I sat up my easel.

Built in 1834, Fort Monroe is the largest stone fort in the country.  It was a military installation located in Hampton Roads, Virginia, overlooking the Chesapeake Bay.  Fort Monroe was decommissioned on September 11, 2011.  It now is a National Monument.

 

Ft Monroe.jpg

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